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News

  • GoBizNYC

    Staten Island WBE Grows Despite Geographic Challenges

    by Victor Wong

    The following entry is part of The Small Business Corner, a collaboration between Gotham Gazette and GoBizNYC:

    GoBizNYC recently spoke with Ryan Walsh, President of Walsh Electrical Contracting, a long-established family-owned business based on Staten Island that continues to find new opportunities to grow and evolve thanks to the city's large and diverse market potential. The City's minority & women-owned business enterprise (M/WBE) program was key to the firm's most recent expansion. Walsh participated in the record $690 million in city contracts awarded to M/WBEs by the de Blasio Administration last month, a figure that has much room for growth, according to recent analysis of the program by Comptroller Stringer. The company's experience shows that, while New York City businesses face significant challenges, they also have great opportunities, especially when government is committed to supporting its business community.

  • GoBizNYC

    Opening a Beer Hall in the Bronx: Lessons in Trial and Error

    by Victor Wong

    The following entry is part of The Small Business Corner, a collaboration between Gotham Gazette and GoBizNYC:

    Recently, GoBizNYC met with Bronxites Anthony Ramirez II, Paul Ramirez, and John Martin to discuss their experience starting up The Bronx Beer Hall. Located in the historic Arthur Avenue Retail Market, The Bronx Beer Hall was founded in February 2013 and has since become an indelible part of the community. Anthony and John are serial entrepreneurs — in 2006, they founded Mainland Media, a company that sells Bronx-themed merchandise designed by local artists.

  • GoBizNYC

    Small Business Cost & Regulatory Hurdles in New York City

    by Victor Wong

    The following entry is part of The Small Business Corner, a collaboration between Gotham Gazette and GoBizNYC:

    We seldom hear small business owners weigh in on the public policy issues that impact their ability to hire and grow in New York City, partly because they are busy earning a living and partly out of their fear of getting embroiled in politics that could impact their customer and regulatory relationships. The following is a telling interview with Rachel, an entrepreneur who asked us not to use her last name, but whose story reflects the experience of neighborhood businesses throughout the five boroughs.

  • GoBizNYC

    Don't Hinder Small Business Growth

    by Victor Wong

    The following entry is part of The Small Business Corner, a collaboration between Gotham Gazette and GoBizNYC:

    recent piece in The New York Times highlighted how heavy regulations have inhibited growth among businesses in France. When French businesses grow to 50 or more employees, they are subject to a host of employment and accounting regulations that significantly increase their operating and administrative costs. As a result, many companies cap their firm size at 49 employees. With unemployment in France stuck at a record high of above 10% as well as continued private sector contraction, such disincentives to growth do not bode well for the country's worsening economic situation.

  • GoBizNYC

    The City Must Step Up on Sandy Business Recovery

    By Linda Baran, President, Staten Island Chamber of Commerce

    The following entry is part of The Small Business Corner, a collaboration between Gotham Gazette and GoBizNYC:

    At a recent a press conference on the City's Sandy recovery progress, Mayor Bill de Blasio noted: "Relief can't come fast enough for homeowners and small business owners who have already waited too long." We cannot agree more. Twenty-one months after the storm, so much more remains to be done. The City needs to expedite programs, provide grants—even retroactively—and implement a better approach to resiliency planning in neighborhoods ravished by Sandy.

  • GoBizNYC

    The Small Business Corner, with GoBizNYC

    By Victor Wong, Director of Business Outreach & GoBizNYC, Partnership for New York City

    Small businesses are the backbone of our local economy. They define the character of our neighborhoods and exemplify the entrepreneurial spirit of both new and native New Yorkers. Often, they are where young people get their first work experience and where seniors find a job that helps them make ends meet in their retirement years.

  • GoBizNYC

    A Look Back at the Past Six Months

    GoBizNYC continues to work to strengthen the voice of small, immigrant, and minority-owned business. We want to create an environment where small businesses can flourish, generating jobs and strengthening our city’s neighborhood economies. Here is a recap of what we have accomplished over the past six months:

  • GoBizNYC

    The Rise of Small Business Credit Innovations

    http://www.newyorkfed.org/smallbusiness/small-business-summit.html

  • GoBizNYC

    Testimony Before the Committee on Civil Service and Labor of the New York City Council

    By Daniel Powers Jr, Small Business Owner, Real Brave Audio & Director, After School Rocks

    Good afternoon. My name is Daniel Powers. I am a musician and for the past 9 years I have owned and managed Real Brave Audio, a music school and small business located out in Fresh Meadows, Queens. I am also the founder and director of After School Rocks, a soon-to-be-official 501c3 foundation. The basic premise behind Real Brave and After School Rocks is simple and something we can all get behind: give kids access to music education. I've worked in schools and in my community to get affordable music instruction to kids and, perhaps more importantly, develop great paying jobs for musicians and help them build careers. I am of the opinion that there is nothing small about small business. Everything you think, do, buy or invest in is big. Every employee you hire is a big deal. Every regulation or fine – no matter how small – is a game changer. 

  • GoBizNYC

    Statement from GoBizNYC on Final Bill Language for Expansion of Paid Sick Leave

    February 20, 2014 - The New York City Council today released final bill language for Intro 1, which expands the city’s requirement that employers provide at least five days of paid sick leave. The law takes effect April 1, 2014, but in response to the concerns of GoBizNYC and others, the bill has been amended to provide for a six month “cure period” during which businesses with 5-19 employees would not be penalized for unintentionally violating the new law. Revised language also reduces the period for filing complaints against an employer from three years to two years. These are changes that will make it less difficult for smaller businesses to comply with the new mandate.

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